Poetry Language and Forms – An Uplifting and Educational Journey For Relaxation of the Soul

Tree Good is an excellent poetess who demonstrates her leadership in this arena through her book The Language of Poetry Forms. The book is divided into three areas as follows: The first starts with poetry idioms and meanings, the second covers poetry forms with examples, and the third ends with a funny section on riddles about poetry. The poetic platform in this book allows anyone to gain a basic comprehension of poetry forms while reading. The various poetic illustrations will enlighten the reader, and the section with riddles should enforce the writing principles of poetry for anyone reading this book.

The illustrations of the many types and styles of poems in this book present a profound knowledge and admiration of her poetic artistry. Good is like an excellent literary physician who translates difficult concepts of autonomic and physiological poetic formulas into common and understandable language. Her writing style comes across in a clear manner so an average person seeking poetic knowledge can readily comprehend it with no problem. She writes the book with clarity and brevity. Additionally, she lists her poems throughout the book in an alphabetical order which is easily followed.

Good has several poems in the book regarding the following subject areas: love for each other, musical appreciation, seasons of the year, family relationships, and common issues regarding life. The riddle section of the book is an easy challenge for the reader’s knowledge and wits, and it comes across in a humorous manner. This section is funny and entertaining. It is also enlightening to a person’s sensibility and should make the reader laugh out loud. Her book is wonderful and comes highly recommended. It’s definitely a book to keep close at hand as a future reference to live by when writing poetry.

Finally, this is a wonderful poetic text to study. The knowledge and experience developed by Good over the years from being an active participant in the poetry arena is unquestionable. Her skill level is on the cutting edge of poetry as an educator. Any individual who reads and enjoys her writings will truly know about the essence and the art of poetry. Her writings should be easier to comprehend, than actually being a student in a poetry classroom, because she breaks the poetry forms down in simple terms for ease of understanding.

Assessing Therapies Through Interaction and Education

Traditional cognitive behavior therapeutic studies help to identify issues that cause psychological stress and challenging behaviors. Cognitive behavior therapy also teaches the person how to solve problems through goal-oriented activities or systematic procedures. Functional assessment collects functional assessment information and identifies the hypothesis or hypotheses maintaining problem behavior. The information will confirm that the hypothesis or hypotheses are correct then a summary will be developed based on the functional assessment findings. There are a number of different tools used to assess social skills, physiological setting events, quality of life, and other important areas of an individual’s life that can be used in a functional assessment. In the mental health field, research, and statistical significance cannot be explained by chance alone. Therefore, statistical significance and assessment is important in examining cognitive therapies.

Therapy through interaction teaches individuals how to communicate, improve decision-making skills and improve attention span. It also facilitates communication and socialization among staff and individuals. Communicative development varies with individuals because of functioning ability. Communication tools increase the ability to initiate, anticipate, engage, and interact. At times, a person can have difficulty using objects based on joint attention, difficulty in interpretation, and motivation.

Therapy through education is an intervention that investigates, defines, and addresses an individual’s pattern of learning strengths and deficiencies. Therapy goals include restoring self-esteem; improving the learning process, developing learning strategies, and helping the person feel comfortable in his or her learning environment. Processing is the way we think and learn. We have strengths and weaknesses concerning learning. We learn by taking in information through our five senses. Some people learn better by watching, and some people learn better by listening which refers to visual and auditory processing. Attention and memory are also a part of processing. As attention deficits are more accurately and more frequently diagnosed, their effects on learning are also more specifically identified. Attention deficits make a student less available for learning. This means that the person may not be paying attention and missing a good portion of any lesson in the classroom. The purpose of education therapy will be to train individuals on how to improve their money management skills, independent living skills, and cognitive awareness.

When an individual can learn or improve on a new skill, he or she will feel a sense of accomplishment. Assessing these skills will assist the individual in improving in problem or weaker areas. Furthermore, the accomplishment will improve self-esteem, which may stabilize moods and alleviate challenging behaviors. The development educational through interaction is very important to everyone’s lives. Learning new ways to develop skills will give individuals better opportunities to become independent and integrate into society.

Colleges and Education: Are Students Really Being Educated?

My associates in the financial service industry acknowledge that college graduates from United States universities are generally unprepared for entry-level professional positions. They have particularly noticed a drop in basic skills. Students who were once hired from accredited second-tier universities can no longer be relied upon to meet even minimal standards in many professional entry-level positions. (Note: I refer to top-tier as only one to two dozen colleges across the nation. These are Ivies and several select colleges such as MIT and Johns Hopkins.)

A business executive may hire a graduate from what he believes is a top-performing business school that also boasts a nationally ranked football team into a marketing or customer service assignment. (Colleges that sport nationally ranked teams are characteristic of second-tier schools.) He must spend valuable time coaching and monitoring the new employee as the graduate lacks the most basic core skills. But executives today just do not have the time to do this in a time-stressed high-pressured corporate environment.

Managers are shocked by poor writing and language skills of recent graduates.

The situation is far worse than you might imagine. The results of my interviews with business people in many corporations conclude that students cannot function effectively in their chosen fields of study. Also, they often are severely deficient in written language and reasoning skills required to make incisive judgments and decisions. The standards have sunk so low that many students from second-tier universities cannot write a paragraph without making a major spelling or grammatical mistake.

Yet the universities continue to accept the students in far greater numbers than in past decades, and offer little effective remedial help for students in need. And what is most distressing is that, as a result of grade inflation, almost every student can graduate from an accredited college today while receiving little or no help from their universities to rectify severe learning problems.

Professors have little experience in their field and have no incentive to teach effectively.

Full-time professors have their PhD but little real-life experience in their field of study. Consequently, at the end of four years, students have little acquired knowledge and cannot think critically in their chosen career field. Professors, especially those who have tenure and are almost impossible to relieve, show little concern with their own job performance and have relatively little incentive to instruct to high standards.

It’s a fact!

You don’t have to take my word alone for any of this. In one of the few honest and broad-based surveys of businesses conducted by an academic association, the Association of American Colleges and Universities in January of 2007 disclosed that two-thirds of the employers surveyed said that college graduates lack the skills to succeed in today’s economic environment. In fact, more than 70 percent said colleges just weren’t doing the job of emphasizing critical and analytical reasoning as well as creativity and innovation. These are just the things that colleges hang their hats on when trumpeting the value of a college education. Think of how really bad this is.

If the education is so bad, who can we hire?

So what can an executive do? She will hire only from top-tier schools that recruit their incoming freshmen from the very top of their high school classes. If her field is highly specialized, she may even go outside the country and recruit students from Asia, India or Argentina (hotbeds of Information Technology) where professors have experience in their fields. The students from these schools will have the knowledge, the tenacity, and, hopefully, the appetite to get the job done professionally.

With few job prospects, most graduates are coming out of college with nothing to show for their four years. They don’t even receive an education.